Tomorrow's Health by Steve Klasko, MD, MBA

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USF Health students ready to lead change in health care

One of the best things about our students in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine is how many of them are already emerging as leaders.

A group of our students just traveled to Capitol Hill to push for greater federal funding of graduate medical education. And one of those students, William Pearce, has just been chosen for a Government Relations Advocacy Fellowship for American Medical News.

I had the privilege of chatting with some of these same students – along with other students from across our USF Health disciplines and my colleague Dr. Bob Brooks – last week at a “Health Huddle” sponsored by the USF chapter of the American Medical Association.

AMA_Huddle 001-webChatting as we start the AMA Health Huddle.

Our students asked such thoughtful questions about the future of health: How can nurses and doctors work together better to improve primary care? How can we bring more young doctors into family medicine? How can we help patients improve their health? Do we let medical procedures get in the way of talking with patients?

I told our students how, back in 1977, I had just seen a Rolling Stones concert. There was a new movie out called Rise of Planet of the Apes. And I was preparing a talk about medicine, asking questions like these:

  • Can we do anything about spiraling healthcare costs?
  • Can we change the fee-for-service system?
  • Can we find a better way to measure health outcomes?

Fast forward thirty-five years…We’re still listening to the Stones. We just saw a remake of Planet of the Apes. And we’re still asking those exact same questions about health care.

AMA_Huddle 004-web

Students at the AMA Health Huddle.

Here’s the good news: Nobody believes we’re going to go another 35 years – or even five years – without significant change in health care. That’s why I’m so excited that we are having these conversations here at USF Health. The only question is whether we’re going to be behind that change or leading that change.

And with students like ours, I know we’re seeing the next generation of healthcare leaders right here on our campus.

AMA_Huddle 008-web

We had lots of provocative questions at the Health Huddle.


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