Displaying the Our Research Category

Health risks and the herbicide Roundup: How litigation helps weed through claims

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Glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weed and grass killer Roundup, has become the most widely used agricultural pesticide in the world. And as its use has exploded, so, too, have claims—and subsequent lawsuits—aiming to link the chemical to certain cancers, birth defects and other health hazards. Dr. Katherine Drabiak, […]

Federal data undercounts fatal overdose deaths caused by specific drugs

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Fatal misuse of specific drugs is a bigger problem than federal statistics make them appear, especially in Florida. According to data collected by a researcher at the University of South Florida (USF), between 2008 and 2017, roughly one-in-three overdose deaths in Florida caused by opioids were not reported by the […]

Rays Jiang, COPH genomics professor, named highly cited researcher

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In November, USF College of Public Health (COPH) assistant professor Dr. Rays Jiang, a founding member of the USF genomics program, was named a 2019 Global Highly Cited Researcher by the Web of Science Group, a citation index and research intelligence platform. Jiang was among 6,216 researchers spanning 21 fields […]

Three COPH students present posters at APHA annual meeting

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Each year the 117 chapters of Delta Omega, a public health student honor society, can nominate one undergraduate and two graduate students from their respective schools to present posters at the APHA annual meeting. This year all three USF College of Public Health students nominated were selected. According to the […]

Local vet credits ART with helping him overcome wartime trauma

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In June, the state of Florida passed into law House Bill 501, allowing the Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs to contract with a state university to provide and evaluate alternative treatment options for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injuries. Florida is the only state in the […]

People with HIV are dying from cigarette smoking: Is video treatment the answer?

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The Great American Smokeout is November 21. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 40 percent of people living with HIV are cigarette smokers—at least twice the rate of the general public. What’s more, people with HIV are less likely than others to quit smoking and […]

Can PTSD pass from mother to baby? COPH genomics researchers aim to find out

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Twenty-five years ago, nearly one million people died in the Rwandan genocide against ethnic Tutsi. Today, 26 percent of Rwandan adults suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a psychological health condition triggered by witnessing or being involved in highly stressful events, such as natural disasters, violence or war. Drs. Monica […]

Body size and the immune system

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Can body size impact how an immune system fights disease? Does an elephant have a different immune system than a mouse? According to USF College of Public Health (COPH) professor Dr. Lynn (Marty) Martin and colleagues, it’s a subject that’s been virtually unstudied. Until now. Martin and others recently published […]