Displaying the Our Research Category

Can PTSD pass from mother to baby? COPH genomics researchers aim to find out

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Home Page Feed, COPH Office of Research, Featured News, Global Health Research News, Intl Programs, Monday Letter, Our Research, Our World

Twenty-five years ago, nearly one million people died in the Rwandan genocide against ethnic Tutsi. Today, 26 percent of Rwandan adults suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a psychological health condition triggered by witnessing or being involved in highly stressful events, such as natural disasters, violence or war. Drs. Monica […]

Body size and the immune system

| Featured News, Monday Letter, Our Research

Can body size impact how an immune system fights disease? Does an elephant have a different immune system than a mouse? According to USF College of Public Health (COPH) professor Dr. Lynn (Marty) Martin and colleagues, it’s a subject that’s been virtually unstudied. Until now. Martin and others recently published […]

USF Initiative on Microbiomes announces first research awards

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Office of Research, Featured News, Monday Letter, Offices, Our Research

Initial transdisciplinary projects focus on neuroscience-related topics The USF Initiative on Microbiomes has awarded its first seed grants to help advance new transdisciplinary microbiome research across departments and colleges. The inaugural Microbiome Research Awards were presented to principal investigators Juan Sanchez-Ramos, MD, PhD, of the USF Health Morsani College of […]

Alumna Dr. Rema Ramakrishnan publishes research on rare musculosketetal birth defect

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Office of Research, Featured News, Monday Letter, Our Alumni, Our Research

While smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of health problems for developing babies, such as preterm birth, low birth rate and birth defects of the lip and mouth, could there also be an association to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a rare musculoskeletal birth defect? USF College of Public Health alumna […]

Dr. Katherine Drabiak examines the use of medication assisted treatment in fight against opioid addiction

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Office of Research, Featured News, Monday Letter, Our Research

The National Institutes of Health estimates that more than 2 million Americans are addicted to prescription opioids (e.g., fentanyl, oxycodone) and heroin. Some experts and federal policy makers think medication assisted treatment (MAT) is the most effective way to treat opioid addiction and use. Others, such as Dr. Katherine Drabiak, […]

Keeping vulnerable populations out of the hospital

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Home Page Feed, COPH Office of Research, Featured News, Monday Letter, Our Research

The conditions in which you live, learn, work and play can all affect your overall health, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. USF College of Public Health doctoral student Nnadozie Emechebe is lead author on a recent study published in The American Journal of Managed Care examining […]

Deidre Orriola and colleagues turn disaster-relief mission into research paper

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Home Page Feed, Featured News, Intl Programs, Monday Letter, Our Alumni, Our Research, Our World, Undergraduate

Forty-five days after Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico, Deidre Orriola, a USF College of Public Health (COPH) faculty instructor, health educator and alumna, traveled to the municipality of Vega Baja on the island as part of a nongovernmental disaster medical team (DMT). The interdisciplinary team consisted of Dr. Jessica […]

Religion associated with HPV vaccination rate for college women

| Academic & Student Affairs, COPH Home Page Feed, COPH Office of Research, Featured News, Monday Letter, Offices, Our Research

It’s been more than a decade since a vaccine was introduced to prevent contraction of human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends patients start receiving the vaccine between ages 11 and 12, with catch-up vaccination recommended […]