Posts Tagged Lynn Martin

Word! Media turns to COPH faculty, alums to explain coronavirus prevalence, prevention, policies

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COVID-19: COPH students, faculty and alums on the front lines When the world is in throes of a pandemic, public health professionals kick into high gear. And the students, faculty and alumni of the USF College of Public Health are no exception. COPHers around the country have been called into […]

Zoonotic disease expert Dr. Lynn “Marty” Martin joins COPH [VIDEO]

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What can house sparrows—and maybe even elephants—tell us about human health? That’s a question Dr. Lynn “Marty” Martin is on a quest to answer. Martin, who specializes in vertebrate physiology and immunology, recently joined the USF College of Public Health faculty, making the move from integrative biology at USF. He […]

PhD student authors paper on the disease dynamics of light pollution

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Meredith Kernbach, a third-year USF College of Public Health (COPH) doctoral student in global health, was lead author on the article “Dim Light at Night: Physiological and Ecological Consequences for Infectious Disease.” The paper was published recently in the journal Integrative and Comparative Biology. The article notes that light pollution, […]

Stress bites! USF researchers study mosquito/bird interactions

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Research shows stressed-out birds more attractive to mosquitoes, raising fears birds exposed to stressors such as road noise, pesticides and light pollution, will be bitten more often and spread more West Nile virus. When researchers from the University of South Florida (USF) and colleagues investigated how the stress hormone, corticosterone, […]